ITA Singles Rankings by Country

Fall rankings

Yesterday, the ITA released its first rankings of the 2018-19 academic year. Given all the conversation about how many international versus American players are playing college tennis, I thought it would be interesting to look at the country of record for the top incoming Division I freshmen as well as the Top 25 overall Division I players. Here you go:

Women’s Newcomers
Rank Player School Country
1 Maria Mateas Duke USA
2 Emmanuelle Salas Florida State France
3 Elysia Bolton UCLA USA
4 Maria Lourdes Carle Georgia Argentina
5 Salma Ewing USC USA
6 Cameron Morra North Carolina USA
7 Anastasia Iamachkine Pepperdine Peru
8 Martina Capurro Taborda Oklahoma Argentina
9 Tijana Spasojevic Texas Serbia
10 Emmanouela Antonakis Mississippi State Greece
Men’s Newcomers
Rank Player School Country
1 Sam Riffice Florida USA
2 Matej Vocel Oklahoma State Czech Republic
3 Juan Pablo Grassi Mazzuchi UCF Argentina
4 Trent Bryde Georgia USA
5 Finn Bass Baylor Great Britain
6 Dominik Kellovsky Arizona State Czech Republic
7 Brian Cernoch North Carolina USA
8 Yuta Kikuchi California Japan
9 Sander Jong TCU Netherlands
10 Francisco Bastias Miami Argentina
Women’s Top 25
Rank Player School Country
1 Bianca Turati Texas Italy
2 Makenna Jones North Carolina USA
3 Estela Perez-Somarriba Miami Spain
4 Ashley Lahey Pepperdine USA
5 Gabriela Knutson Syracuse Czech Republic
6 Anastasia Rychagova Kansas Russia
7 Fernanda Contreras Vanderbilt USA
8 Katarina Jokic Georgia Bosnia
9 Stacey Fung Washington Canada
10 Michaela Gordon Stanford USA
11 Carla Touly Florida State France
12 Kelly Chen Duke USA
13 Melissa Lord Stanford USA
14 Marie-Alexandre Leduc Clemson Canada
15 Jada Hart UCLA USA
16 Emma Davis Wake Forest USA
17 Michaela Bayerlova Washington State Germany
18 Kate Fahey Michigan USA
19 Alle Sanford North Carolina USA
20 Marianna Petrei Idaho Italy
21 Anna Turati Texas Italy
22 Rosie Johanson Virginia Canada
23 Veronica Miroshnichenko Loyola Marymount Russia
24 Emily Arbuthnott Stanford England
25 Vanessa Wong Washington Canada
Men’s Top 25
Rank Player School Country
1 Petros Chrysochos Wake Forest Cyprus
2 Nuno Borges Mississippi State Portugal
3 Mazen Osama Alabama Egypt
4 Brandon Holt USC USA
5 Giovanni Oradini Mississippi State Italy
6 Timo Stodder Tennessee Germany
7 Cameron Klinger Vanderbilt USA
8 Thomas Laurent Oregon France
9 Carl Soderlund Virginia Sweden
10 Alex Rybakov TCU USA
11 Johannes Ingildsen Florida Denmark
12 Mitch Harper Virginia Tech Australia
13 Victor Pham Columbia USA
14 Tim Sandkaulen Ole Miss Germany
15 Aziz Dougaz Florida State Tunisia
16 Aleksandre Bakshi Oklahoma Georgia
17 JJ Wolf Ohio State USA
18 Lucas Poullain Florida State France
19 Alex Lebedev Notre Dame USA
20 Oliver Crawford Florida USA
21 Benjamin Sigouin North Carolina Canada
22 Jan Zielinski Georgia Poland
23 Aswin Lizen Virginia Great Britain
24 Alexis Galarneau NC State Canada
25 Valentin Vacherot Texas A&M France

Four out of the 10 female newcomers (40%) are American with just 3 out of 10 (30%) men coming from the US. Out of the Top 25, 40% of the women and 28% of the men are from the US. You can see the complete lists of rankings on the ITA website here. I also encourage you to read the Cracked Racquets series titled “Where in the World” to get more details on the Division I breakdown. You can find Part 1 here, Part 2 here, Part 3 here, and Part 4 here.

Colette discusses not only who is IN these first ranking lists but also who is NOT in her latest ZooTennis post here.

The ITA has only released rankings for Division I so far. Once they release them for the other divisions, I will do a similar breakdown so stay tuned.

3 Comments on “ITA Singles Rankings by Country”

  1. A general rule of thumb that juniors and their parents should follow (for women’s tennis) is that each D1 school will have two scholarships per year and that one of those scholarships is going to a foreign player. That still leaves a lot of opportunities for US players in D1. The problem is that too many players, and their parents, are not being realistic with their preferences. There are many D1 schools who are absolutely not going to look at you if you are not a blue-chip. If you are not a 5-star then you are not going to get a scholarship at a D1 Power-5 conference school (yes, there may be one or two exceptions to the rule). When you add in the Ivies and some of the mid-majors, who grab some of the 5-stars, that means the Power 5 schools have a choice: take a 4-star or add another foreign player. Look at the team rosters and then tell me which way they end up choosing.

  2. The ITA just released the list of seeds for the upcoming ITA All-American (men’s) tournament in Tulsa. Here is the list with country of origin:

    1. Nuno Borges, Mississippi State – Portugal
    2. Mazen Osama, Alabama – Egypt
    3. Giovanni Oradini, Mississippi State – Italy
    4. Timo Stodder, Tennessee – Germany
    5. Cameron Klinger, Vanderbilt – USA
    6. Thomas Laurent, Oregon – France
    7. Johannes Ingildsen, Florida – Denmark
    8. Mitch Harper, Virginia Tech – Australia
    9-16. Tim Sandkaulen, Ole Miss – Germany
    9-16. Jan Zielinski, Georgia – Poland
    9-16. Aswin Lizen, Virginia – Great Britain
    9-16. Lucas Poullain, Florida State – France
    9-16. Aleksander Bakshi, Oklahoma – Georgia
    9-16. JJ Wolf, Ohio State – USA
    9-16. Oliver Crawford, Florida – USA
    9-16. Alex Lebedev, Notre Dame – USA

    Out of the top 8, there is only one American. Out of the next 8, there are 3 Americans. Is it just me or is it time to change the term “All-American” to something a bit more descriptive of the actual field of players?

  3. And here are the women’s All-American seeds with country of origin:

    1. Makenna Jones, North Carolina – USA
    2. Estela Perez-Somarriba, Miami – Spain
    3. Gabriela Knutson, Syracuse – Czech Republic
    4. Anastasia Rychagova, Kansas – Russia
    5. Fernanda Contreras, Vanderbilt – USA
    6. Katarina Jokic, Georgia – Bosnia
    7. Stacey Fung, Washington – Canada
    8. Michaela Gordon, Stanford – USA

    As you can see, 3 out of the 8 seeds are American.

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